Thesis - Business and Management

Undergraduate business students who enrolled in Fall 2016 or later are required to submit a bachelor thesis, which is the culminating project of their studies at Webster Vienna. This page provides additional information specific to those undergraduate students who are planning, researching, or writing their theses.

Undergraduate Senior Thesis

Additional Resources

Submission

  • Intermediate deadlines for the submission of drafts may be arranged by the student and the supervisor during the semester. 
  • Bachelor theses do not need to be bound. The final version should be submitted to the supervisor. 
  • A PDF of the final version must be submitted to the library

 


BS in Business Administration:

Theses in Business Administration should contribute both to academic knowledge and practical application related to the area of business administration such as business operations, performance, organizational functions and decision making. Theses in this area can be either problem- or opportunity-driven, can concern private companies of all sizes, public organizations and/or NGOs. A particular research interest is given to the business administration topics within new entrepreneurial ventures and SMEs (small and mid-size enterprises).

Each bachelor thesis student is asked to propose an intended audience of his/her thesis. This would typically be one in a management position, e.g. a top manager, a line manager, a project manager, a change leader, or a team leader. The theses must point to managerial implications of the findings. The starting point of each thesis, e.g. the background for the research question, can either be a problem or opportunity experienced in a specific organization; a trend or a phenomenon experienced in the concurrent time, or it can be theory-driven.

Regardless of the starting point, bachelor thesis students in management must base their research methodology on a collection of both primary and secondary data. The primary data can be both qualitative and quantitative, whereas the secondary data can be found in a number of credible sources, depending on the topic, such as industry reports, company website and other online information about the specific organization, employee reviews, financial statements, etc.

 

BA in Management:

Theses in Management contribute both to academic knowledge and practical application in the area of management. Theses in Management will either be problem- or opportunity-driven, and the topics will typically concern issues within private companies, public organizations and/or NGOs, e.g. how to plan and implement an aimed-for change like a new organizational structure; how to enhance knowledge transfer across organizational units; or how to deal with a manager-employee conflict.

As it is required to find a second reader of thesis before final submission, each bachelor thesis student is asked to propose an intended reader of his/her thesis. This would typically be one in a management position, e.g. a top manager, a line manager, a project manager, a change leader, or a team leader. The theses must point to managerial implications of the findings. The starting point of each thesis, e.g. the background for the research question, can either be a problem or opportunity experienced in a specific organization; a trend experienced in the concurrent time (e.g. many companies’ desire to improve sustainability); or it can be theory-driven (e.g. how can managers and employees interact effectively and efficiently in a time where use of Home Office days have become the new norm in many organizations).

Regardless of the starting point, bachelor thesis students within management must base their research methodology on collection of both primary and secondary data. The primary data can be interviews and observations, whereas the secondary data can be online information about the specific organization, employee reviews, etc. 

 

BA in Management with emphasis in International Business:

Theses in Management with emphasis in International Business contribute both to academic knowledge and practical application in the area of international management. Theses in this area can be either either be problem- or opportunity-driven, and the topics will typically concern international management issues within private companies of all sizes, public organizations and/or NGOs. A particular research interest is given to international business and management issues of new entrepreneurship ventures and SMEs (small and mid-size enterprises).

The topic areas may refer to any relevant and contemporary management issue as seen from the international perspective: e.g. international strategy and growth, cross-cultural challenges and differences, organizational structure issues, international marketing issues, etc.
Each bachelor thesis student is asked to propose an intended audience of his/her thesis. This would typically be one in a management position, e.g. a top manager, a line manager, a project manager, a change leader, or a team leader. The theses must point to managerial implications of the findings. The starting point of each thesis, e.g. the background for the research question, can either be a problem or opportunity experienced in a specific organization; a trend or a phenomenon experienced in the concurrent time, or it can be theory-driven.

Regardless of the starting point, bachelor thesis students within management must base their research methodology on a collection of both primary and secondary data. The primary data can be both qualitative and quantitative, whereas the secondary data can be found in number of credible sources, depending on the topic, such as: statistical and company databases, industry reports, company websites and other online information about the specific organization, reviews, etc. 

 

BA in Management with emphasis in Marketing:

Theses in Management with emphasis in Marketing contribute both to academic knowledge and practical application in the area of marketing. To achieve insights that are relevant in the 21st century, bachelor theses are expected to particularly address the enabling and transforming role of information technology and digitization in marketing and consumer behavior.

Therefore, areas of interest for marketing-focused bachelor theses are circulating around electronic commerce business-to-consumer (b2c) and encompass topic areas such as e-commerce business models, multi-/omnichannel business, digital communication, or social media. Furthermore, another area of special interest are the topics revolving around marketing issues of new entrepreneurial ventures and SMEs (small and mid-size enterprises).

Methodology-wise, research in the area of marketing is by nature empirical, therefore each thesis must include primary data collection with quantitative (e.g., survey) or qualitative (e.g., focus group) research designs.