Assis. Prof. Dr. Meng Chen

Assistant Professor, Webster Vienna Private University

 

meng.chen[at]webster.ac.at

 

 

ORCID:
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4503-5226

 

Courses taught at WVPU

  • SPCM 1280    Interpersonal Communication
  • PBRL 4500    Health Communication

Education

Ph.D. in Health Communication
University of California, Davis, 2018

M.A. in Mass Communication
University of Houston, 2011

B.A. in Chinese Language and Literature
Beijing International Studies University, 2009

Background and Facts

Meng Chen is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Media Communications. Her research lies at the intersection of persuasion, health communication, and language use. She is active in two lines of research. One line examines the strategic use of narrative persuasion in health contexts. In particular, she tests how narrative features (e.g., linguistic agency assignment, similarity with story protagonist, point of view, and protagonist competence) influence readers’ engagement with the story character and, ultimately, their health-related perceptions and decision-making. The other research line centers on breast cancer patients’ language use and effects on new media. Taking an interdisciplinary and multi-methodological approach, this research program explores the interactions among linguistic features of patients’ online posts, their personal network structures, and social capital flow on social support platforms.

Her previous research has appeared in journals such as Computers in Human Behavior, Journal of Health Communication, and Communication Research. While in her graduate program, she was a recipient of Provost’s First-Year Fellowships in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences as well as Provost’s Dissertation Fellowships in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.

Selected Publications

Peer-reviewed journal articles
Chen, M., Bell, R. A., & Taylor, L. D. (2017). Persuasive effects of point of view, protagonist competence, and similarity in a health narrative about type 2 diabetes. Journal of Health Communication, 22, 702-712.

Peña, J., & Chen, M. (2017). With great power comes great responsibility: Superhero primes and expansive poses influence prosocial behavior after a motion-controlled game task. Computers in Human Behavior, 76, 378-385.

Peña, J., & Chen, M. (2017). Playing with power: Power poses affect enjoyment, social presence, controller responsiveness, and arousal when playing natural motion controller games. Computers in Human Behavior, 71, 428-435.

Chen, M., Bell, R.A., & Taylor, L.A. (2016). Narrator point of view and persuasion in health narratives: The role of similarity, identification, and susceptibility. Journal of Health Communication, 21, 908-918.

Berger, C., Ya, H., & Chen, M. (2016). Story appraisal theory: From story kernel appraisal to implications and impact. Communication Research, 1, 1-30.

Chen, M., McGlone, M.S., Bell, R.A. (2015). Persuasive effects of linguistic agency assignments and point of view in narrative health messages about colon cancer. Journal of Health Communication, 20, 977-988.

Book Chapters
Chen, M. (Accepted). Strategic use of narratives in health persuasion. In Psychology of Persuasion. Hauppauge, Nova Science Publishers.

Conference papers
Chen, M., Bell, R. A., & Taylor, L. D. (2017, November). Persuasive effects of point of view, protagonist competence, and similarity in a health narrative about type 2 diabetes. Paper to be presented to the National Communication Association Conference, Dallas, TX.

Chen, M., & Pena, J. (2016, November). The effects of physical poses on power feelings and risk-taking behaviors after playing with a motion controlled video game. Paper presented to the National Communication Association Conference, Philadelphia, PA.

Chen, M., Jiang, K., Zhao, L., & Barnett, G. (2015, June). Semantic network analysis of a breast cancer forum in the United States. Paper presented to the International Network for Social Network Analysis, Sunbelt, UK.

Chen, M., & Xiao, Z. (2014, November). Examining the effectiveness of a fear appeal message regarding calling while driving: The role of perceived behavioral control and subjective social norms. Paper presented to the Competitively Selected Papers about Behavioral Responses and Messaging at the National Communication Association Conference, Chicago, IL.

Chen, M., & Bell, R. A. (2014, April). Persuasive effects of linguistic agency assignments and point of view in narrative health messages about colon cancer. Paper presented at the Kentucky Conference Health Communication (KCHC), Lexington, KY.

Ad hoc reviewer
Journal of Health Communication
International Journal of English and Literature
Chinese Journal of Communication